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We all need a little help sometimes. Perhaps you’re a parent dealing with your child’s food allergy diagnosis, in Minnesota or elsewhere. Maybe you’re a childcare provider or school navigating the everyday challenges with food allergy safety and policy development. Or, you’re an individual dealing with the stress of life’s unexpected challenges — you don’t have to go through it alone.

A Gift of Miles offers support to individuals, parents, childcare providers and schools to successfully navigate and grow during times of transition. Our programs are designed to decrease stress and increase quality of life all while finding, creating and flourishing in a new normal.

Taking your life or organization to the next level has never been easier. Leverage Kristin Beltaos’ customized consulting, expertise and training programs to help you identify your goals, develop strategies and action plans that establish a new order.

Whether you’re in Minnesota, nationally or internationally, make a selection under Food Allergy Consulting or Other Services to learn more about how you can find support and assistance that will help you transition to your new chapter.

From the Blog

Book Review: Why can’t I have a Cupcake?

Editor’s Notes:
1) I was so happy that Betsy Childs contacted me to review her new book about food intolerances, Why can’t I have a Cupcake? Her simple, yet meaningful, story along with Dan Olson’s illustrations was a great hit with my sons.

2) When you have a food allergy, it is required that you have two doses of epinephrine in your possession as a second dose may need administered five minutes after the first dose.

Review

My son is attending a birthday party this weekend…a place where tasty treats are always in abundance along with the token slice of “za” (pizza). These social situations are sometimes challenging for those dealing with food allergies, celiac disease or intolerances as assimilation is so important. No matter the challenge, we must teach our children that the celebration is the time we spend together having fun, and much more important than any food.

51odpxI41hL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_In this thoughtful book, Rory, a six-year-old boy, was excited to be going to his friend Poppy’s birthday party where they will have delicious cupcakes. Rory L-O-V-E-S cupcakes, but he is gluten intolerant. He remembers having a stomach ache after eating foods like cupcakes and pancakes.

Rory’s mother dropped him off at the party, hands him his crispy bar and he is off to have some fun! Not only did Rory have an enjoyable time participating in the fun activity and watching Poppy open her birthday presents, he learned that he was not the only one bringing his own treat or an item to keep safe. Celia can’t have peanuts so she came prepared with a tuna sandwich, in case PB & J sandwiches were served. Mason brought an EpiPen® because he’s allergic to bee stings. Lewis has a popsicle because he can’t have ice cream, he’s allergic to dairy. (more…)