EpiPen Hearing Yields High Drama No Substance

Mylan’s CEO Heather Bresch and a Food and Drug Administration deputy director Doug Throckmorton testified before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Wednesday, September 22, 2016, regarding the high price of the EpiPen®. The questions posed and answers provided were nothing short of high drama with no substance.

Since Mylan acquired the EpiPen® in 2007, the product’s price has increased more than 500%. Personally, I can recall the product being as high as $730 and currently it is riding at approximately $608.

It is apparent that Bresch believes the company has taken reasonable steps to relieve the financial burden from consumers by replacing the $100 coupon with a $300 coupon and announcing the upcoming launch of a generic which will retail for approximately $300. However, refusal to simply lower the price of the EpiPen® has consumers feeling betrayed and fuels the government’s perception that Mylan is playing the ultimate shell game. Plus, let’s not forget the only reason that the coupon was upped to $300 and the unprecedented (Bresch’s word) launch of the generic was due to consumer and finally government outcry with Mylan’s hand caught in the proverbial cookie jar.

Throckmorton was raked over the coals because the FDA approval process is oppressively burdensome. In addition, he was unable to report how many FDA applications were filed for competitors to the EpiPen® because it would go against the FDA’s rules.

While listening to the EpiPen® hearing, I started to think about the corporate value lessons learned during the Hobby Lobby case a couple of years ago. Here’s a sentence from Justice Samuel Alito’s opinion in the case that can easily apply to the EpiPen soap opera:

EpiPen Hearing Yields High Drama No Substance

As the bad and the ugly continued to unfold during the hearing, or not unfold for answers not provided, I couldn’t help but also think about the good that Mylan has done with regard to disease awareness, stock epinephrine in schools as well as other places such as zoos, museums, amusement parks, etc. However, any of the good that resulted from Mylan’s efforts is now overshadowed by the ugly. New questions arise such as, Was there even a glimmer of sincerity in those actions? Did Mylan really want to create more investor value and line executive pockets on the backs of food allergic children? Outraged congressional representatives used phrases like a rope-a-dope strategy, an unfair monopoly, a shell game, a sham, something smells fishy, numbers don’t add up, charts that seem dumbed down, and a simple but corrupt business model to describe their understanding of Mylan’s actions.

Just because the government is looking into Mylan’s practices, doesn’t mean our work is over. Continue to communicate with your legislators via calls, emails and letters and share your prescription drug pricing woes until change actually happens!

To truly understand the lack of answers provided, along with some great one liners delivered by government officials, view the full event below in its entirety.

Stay tuned…Heather Bresch and Doug Throckmorton are due to disclose more information in 10 days.

This drama is far from over.

Save on EpiPens and Other Household Prescriptions

Save on EpiPens and Other Household Prescriptions

Save on EpiPens and other household prescriptions? It’s a question that most of us ask ourselves. As you know, healthcare in the United States can be very expensive. While our premiums continue to rise each year, our benefits seem to dwindle. We’re paying more for less coverage, alternative foods are more expensive and the lifesaving medication cost of EpiPen® feels more expensive than ever for many families.

Many are quick to point the finger at Mylan, the maker of the EpiPen®. However, just as health insurance plans are complicated, so is the the pharmaceutical supply system. The pharmaceutical supply chain not only involves pharmaceutical manufacturers, but also multiple parties such as wholesalers, pharmacy retailers, pharmacy benefit managers and payors. These parties all play a role in determining access to, and the ultimate retail price of prescription drugs.

Dan Hammer of 790 AM Fargo Moorhead interviewed me on the high cost of EpiPen®. I prepared a variety of information to share with Dan on the topic of food allergies and epinephrine, but there’s only so much time in an interview, to be exact 13 minutes and 52 seconds. ; ) Click here to listen to the full interview.

Here’s a list of suggestions on how to save money on the EpiPen® as well as other prescription drugs in your household.

Continue reading

EpiPen® hold time is now 3 seconds

The EpiPen® hold time is now 3 seconds and there are other administration guidelines that the FDA has changed due to lacerations and injuries related to usage. There are three points of change listed below; however, you can read the FDAs document in its entirety:

  1. Restrict Patient’s Leg, limit movement during epinephrine administration

    EpiPen® hold time is now 3 seconds

    Image courtesy of Mylan

    Lacerations, bent needles and embedded needles have been reported when epinephrine has been injected into the thigh of a young child that is moving, kicking or uncooperative during administration. To minimize the risk of an injection-related injury it is advised that caregivers hold the child’s leg firmly in place and limit movement prior to and during the injection.

  2. EpiPen® hold time is now 3 seconds

    The EpiPen auto-injector should be held firmly in place for 3 seconds prior to removal.

  3. Serious Infections at the Injection Site

    Rare cases of serious skin and soft tissue infections, including necrotizing fasciitis and myonecrosis caused by Clostridia (gas gangrene), have been reported at the injection site following epinephrine injection for anaphylaxis. Advise patients to seek medical care if they develop signs or symptoms of infection, such as persistent redness, warmth, swelling, or tenderness, at the epinephrine injection site

This information came on the heals of the Minnesota Children’s Health Network finishing a revamp of their Anaphylaxis Action Plan, it was an honor to serve on the committee that examined and enhanced this Plan. The FDAs new administration guidelines will be included in the revamped Anaphylaxis Action Plan that is set to release just in time for the 2016-2017 school year.

If you’re looking for more information, be sure to: check out Mylan’s EpiPen® website, read the box insert of a newly filled EpiPen® prescription, contact a Mylan Customer Relations Representative at 800.395.3376 or speak with your physician.

PLEASE SHARE THIS IMPORTANT LIFE SAVING INFORMATION WITH OTHERS!!!

Food Allergies Are More Than An Awkward Moment

Food Allergies Are More Than An Awkward Moment or Two

Food allergies are more than an awkward moment, yet when you are a parent to a child with a food allergy, or you are the person who has the food allergy…most of the time you feel like you’re asking for special treatment rather than a safety requirement. We’ve all seen the eye rolls, the teasing, the telling glances and even some “friends and family” that are embarrassed of our constant questions. I have always said, “Who would ever choose to live this way?”

John Espinosa messaged me over LinkedIn and shared with me his recent food allergy experience that opened his eyes and caused him to find his voice! I’d like to share his post with you because as I advocate for my son and for other children that have food allergies I realized John’s message needs to be heard LOUD AND CLEAR. He exemplifies everything that we want our kiddos to be…to be confident enough to know who they are and what they need! We want our children to believe and communicate his same messages: “My life should be worth more to you than an awkward moment or two.” and “I’m empowering those who are peer pressured towards death to fight for their lives.”

Join me in READING his story and be sure to SHARE HIS BRAVENESS with others:

“Friday Feburary 26th was a wake up call. A white chocolate chip macadamia nut (… really cashew) cookie landed me square in the hospital. That Friday, I learned to be adamant when it comes to food allergies. Show me an ingredient list. Call out friends that snicker or roll their eyes when I ask the waiter to clarify whether kitchen equipment is scrubbed well between meals. Shut down people who bother me about how my epipens make my pants look clunky.

I AM DONE feeling like an “inconvenience. Continue reading