Save on EpiPens and Other Household Prescriptions

Save on EpiPens and Other Household Prescriptions

Save on EpiPens and other household prescriptions? It’s a question that most of us ask ourselves. As you know, healthcare in the United States can be very expensive. While our premiums continue to rise each year, our benefits seem to dwindle. We’re paying more for less coverage, alternative foods are more expensive and the lifesaving medication cost of EpiPen® feels more expensive than ever for many families.

Many are quick to point the finger at Mylan, the maker of the EpiPen®. However, just as health insurance plans are complicated, so is the the pharmaceutical supply system. The pharmaceutical supply chain not only involves pharmaceutical manufacturers, but also multiple parties such as wholesalers, pharmacy retailers, pharmacy benefit managers and payors. These parties all play a role in determining access to, and the ultimate retail price of prescription drugs.

Dan Hammer of 790 AM Fargo Moorhead interviewed me on the high cost of EpiPen®. I prepared a variety of information to share with Dan on the topic of food allergies and epinephrine, but there’s only so much time in an interview, to be exact 13 minutes and 52 seconds. ; ) Click here to listen to the full interview.

Here’s a list of suggestions on how to save money on the EpiPen® as well as other prescription drugs in your household.

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Teaching your child to care for his food allergies

Teaching your child to care for his food allergies is like creating a stepping stone path. Parents and caregivers take a highly complex topic (food allergy care and independence); break it down into incremental steps to meet the child where he/she is – physically, mentally, emotionally and developmentally.

My life with food allergies began almost 11 years ago with the birth of my son. He was vomiting before we ever left the hospital from delivery and I was told that was due to a poorly developed digestive tract. Fast forward 11-months later, after struggling with reflux, transitioning to baby and table food, unexplained hives and eczema and labeled as borderline failure to thrive; we finally had a diagnosis of food allergies to milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts and sesame. I’ve learned a lot along the way, so I thought I would share some tips on how to steadily grow your child’s independence in an age appropriate way.

THE BEGINNINGS: Teaching Your Child to Care for His Food Allergies

Teach your child what he/she is allergic to using different methods.

Teaching Your Child to Care for His Food Allergies

Image courtesy of photobucket / How to Ask Me

Teaching your child to care for his food allergies means bringing it down to your child’s level. Place pictures, along with the words, of your child’s allergens onto a piece of paper and tape it to the back of the headrest in the car. This teaches a child in two ways (1) visually seeing the pictures and words and (2) verbally, by periodically asking, “What are you allergic to?” My son rattled off his list of allergens in no time. This is also a great tool for learning a home address and phone numbers. Google Images and Photobucket are great places to gather images.

A second way is to casually, and by casually I mean in a non-alarming way, introduce your child to his allergens while you’re at the grocery store. It’s important for him to see the allergen in the bag, e.g., these are peanuts. The jug on this shelf is cow’s milk. The cartons in this display case are eggs, etc.

Explain to your child why his food is sometimes different than what other people are eating.

It’s natural for your child to see certain foods and want to try them, even if they are unsafe. At a very young age, explain that certain foods are not good for him because it will make him sick, and then divert him to the large variety of foods that he can partake of. It’s important to focus on what one can have rather than what one cannot have, concentrating on the positive versus the negative. For example, instead of saying, “You cannot have that ice cream because you’re allergic to milk.” Say, “That ice cream does look delicious, but this soy ice cream is just as yummy and safe for you.” 

At a young age, teach your child how to read labels because it’s confusing and takes some time to learn.

Teaching Your Child to Care for His Food Allergies

Teaching your child to care for his food allergies means discussing how to read ingredient and manufacturing labels at a very young age. When the time comes for him to take the reins…HE’LL BE READY! : )

Reading labels is confusing for parents, let alone children. Show labels to a child early not only to instill the habit of looking, but learning the variety of names for an allergen, i.e., milk isn’t just milk, it’s casein, whey, etc. Your child will be able to help make educated decisions, along with your help, so that one day he will make well-informed decisions on his own.

In addition, it’s just as important to understand how to read manufacturing labels. Your child needs to know that anything “manufactured on shared equipment,” “in a facility that manufactures” their allergen or “may contain” labels are not safe food options. Moreover, just because a label does not disclose their manufacturing practices, doesn’t mean it’s safe, rather it requires a telephone call to the manufacturer to inquire about their manufacturing processes. Continue reading

EpiPen® hold time is now 3 seconds

The EpiPen® hold time is now 3 seconds and there are other administration guidelines that the FDA has changed due to lacerations and injuries related to usage. There are three points of change listed below; however, you can read the FDAs document in its entirety:

  1. Restrict Patient’s Leg, limit movement during epinephrine administration

    EpiPen® hold time is now 3 seconds

    Image courtesy of Mylan

    Lacerations, bent needles and embedded needles have been reported when epinephrine has been injected into the thigh of a young child that is moving, kicking or uncooperative during administration. To minimize the risk of an injection-related injury it is advised that caregivers hold the child’s leg firmly in place and limit movement prior to and during the injection.

  2. EpiPen® hold time is now 3 seconds

    The EpiPen auto-injector should be held firmly in place for 3 seconds prior to removal.

  3. Serious Infections at the Injection Site

    Rare cases of serious skin and soft tissue infections, including necrotizing fasciitis and myonecrosis caused by Clostridia (gas gangrene), have been reported at the injection site following epinephrine injection for anaphylaxis. Advise patients to seek medical care if they develop signs or symptoms of infection, such as persistent redness, warmth, swelling, or tenderness, at the epinephrine injection site

This information came on the heals of the Minnesota Children’s Health Network finishing a revamp of their Anaphylaxis Action Plan, it was an honor to serve on the committee that examined and enhanced this Plan. The FDAs new administration guidelines will be included in the revamped Anaphylaxis Action Plan that is set to release just in time for the 2016-2017 school year.

If you’re looking for more information, be sure to: check out Mylan’s EpiPen® website, read the box insert of a newly filled EpiPen® prescription, contact a Mylan Customer Relations Representative at 800.395.3376 or speak with your physician.

PLEASE SHARE THIS IMPORTANT LIFE SAVING INFORMATION WITH OTHERS!!!

My Son Forgot Epinephrine: A+ Problem Solving

My Son Forgot Epinephrine: A+ in Problem Solving

He forgot epinephrine and that sounds like a nightmare.

There isn’t a quick fix to this problem, is there? There isn’t a handy dandy saying to help you, like “Stop, Drop and Roll.” You can’t cross your arms like Jeannie, blink and have Epinephrine in hand.

forgot epinephrine - Key to solving a problem? Staying calm and think about your options.

Key to solving a problem? Staying calm and think about your options.

My son is a Student Council representative. In this role, it requires him to be at school early in the morning for meetings or to work at the school store. Per his Anaphylaxis Action Plan our son is not permitted to regularly self-carry his epinephrine, only under certain conditions defined by his parents. Student Council is one of those conditions where we permit him to self-carry.

The evening prior to a Student Council morning our son takes his Emergency Medication Pack from his sports duffle bag and places it into his school backpack. On these mornings, my husband drops our son off at school. Two schoolteachers, who are familiar with our son’s food allergies and the location of the Emergency Medication Pack, staff the council meetings. Continue reading